Ellis Island National Monument (Statue of Liberty) Quarter

The Ellis Island National Monument (Statue of Liberty) Quarter will be released by the US Mint in 2017.  It will be the fourth quarter of the year issued and will also be the thirty-ninth quarter out of the 56 in the United States Mint America the Beautiful Quarters® Program.

There will be several design candidates for each of the 2017 quarters, including the Ellis Island National Monument (Status of Liberty) Quarter.  Each design will be reviewed by several groups and individuals before being passed on to the Treasury Secretary.  The Treasury Secretary will choose the final design for each 2017 quarter, and those final designs should be announced by the US Mint in late 2016.

This series will be in its eighth year with the release of the 2017 quarters including the Ellis Island National Monument (Statue of Liberty) Quarter. A complete listing is available on the Park Quarters Release Schedule page.

Before the Ellis Island National Monument (Statue of Liberty) Quarter is issued by the Mint in 2017, the Effigy Mounds Quarter, Frederic Douglas Quarter and Ozark National Scenic Riverways Quarter will be released.  Following the Ellis Island Quarter will be the George Rogers Clark National Historical Park Quarter, which will be the last of 2017.

Ellis Island National Monument (Statue of Liberty) information

Ellis Island National Monument (Statue of Liberty) of New Jersey was named after Samuel Ellis, who owned the island before it was an immigration headquarters.  Throughout the entire time Ellis Island was open to immigrants, there were over 12 million people who passed through, which is how over 40% of Americans can trace their ancestry to Ellis Island.

Due to a change in immigration laws the United States needed a place to process incoming immigrants.  Immigration used to be handled at the state level, and each state had different requirements.  Eventually, as immigration laws began to evolve, it was easier for embassies overseas to handle outgoing residents of other countries.  In 1954, Ellis Island closed.

Each year, visitors come to tour the island, which was reopened in 1990 as a museum.  The island was able to expand from 3.3 to 27.5 acres thanks to construction from the New York subway system, and other sources.  The excess land from the construction was used to build up the island.