Barrasso supports National Park Quarters

The National Parks Quarter bill first appeared in the House of Representatives when Rep. Mike Castle introduced it on June 4, 2008. On June 26, Senator John Barrasso brought a similar measure (S.3214) before the Senate, showing his support for park and site coins.

When the House unanimously passed their bill (H.R.6184) July 9, Barrasso voiced his continuing support and said the first coin will depict Wyoming’s Yellowstone National Park.

"As the nation’s first national park, it is only fitting that Yellowstone, as a part of Wyoming ‘s unique heritage, is commemorated on the first quarter," Barrasso said. "I believe these coins will increase awareness and promote efforts to preserve America ‘s national treasures for generations to come."

"Millions of people experience the pristine wilderness and rugged beauty of areas like Yellowstone National Park, the Grand Tetons, and Devil’s Tower National Monument every year. The people of Wyoming are rightly proud of the many places that display our state’s unique heritage and natural beauty."

Now Barrasso must get his Senate colleagues to pass the bill!

House passes Park Quarters bill, next steps

The National Park Quarter bill will create at least 56 newly designed quarters over a ten-year period for national parks and sites in each state, D.C. and U.S. Territory. The bill (H.R.6184) passed in the U.S. House on July 9, 2008 opening the door for its next steps.

The Senate must now consider and pass it.

In a supportive move, Senator John Barrasso introduced an identical vesion (S.3214) on June 26, 2008. This version or that of the House will eventually get scheduled for a Senate up or down vote. (There is a chance both bills will die in silence in some committee forever. An article by an online news site for coin collectors suggests the odds are small.)

There are, of course, no guarantees the bill becomes law. However, while some collectors dislike the idea of another new quarter series, their disdain hasn’t been similarly voiced by members of congress.

After Senate passage by vote, any differences between the House and Senate versions will need to be reconciled, voted on again and then a final version sent to the President for signing. Once signed, the bill becomes law.